Welcome back! The Rockwell is open - read up on health and safety information before your visit>>
  • The Mormon History Association presents:
    An American Journey Across the Landscape of Mormon Theology

    Saturday, March 7, 2015
    5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

    Add to Calendar 03/07/2015 5:30 PM 03/07/2015 7:00 PM America/New_York The Mormon History Association presents:
    An American Journey Across the Landscape of Mormon Theology

    Saturday, March 7, 2015

    Cyrus Edwin Dallin, Appeal to the Great Spirit, 1912, Plaster, metal armature, paint, 40 x 27 x 40 in. Gift of J. N. Bartfield Galleries, New York, in Memory of Jack N. Bartfield. 91.44 F

    Cyrus Edwin Dallin, Appeal to the Great Spirit, 1912, Plaster, metal armature, paint, 40 x 27 x 40 in. Gift of J. N. Bartfield Galleries, New York, in Memory of Jack N. Bartfield. 91.44 F

    5:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Galleries open for viewing
    5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Lecture/Interview with Terryl L. Givens

    The Mormon History Association presents:
    An American Journey Across the Landscape of Mormon Theology

    Free and open to the public

    Advance reservations have closed.  Space will be available at the door.  

    The history of the Mormon faith is a uniquely American journey originating in the shady woodlands of upstate New York in the 19th century, moving across the plains, opening new frontiers and finally setting its roots to flourish in the stark desert landscapes of the mountainous West. American sculptor and Utahan, Cyrus E. Dallin, whose Native American subjects are featured at The Rockwell Museum, was commissioned by the Mormon Church to sculpt the original Angel Moroni for the spire of the Salt Lake Temple in Utah. His statue became an enduring symbol of the Mormon faith and today remains the model for the sculpted angels now topping more than 140 temples throughout the world.

    We invite you to join us March 7 at 5:30 p.m. for a lecture sponsored by The Mormon History Association. The event will feature Professor Terryl L. Givens, as he “traces the essential contours of Mormon thought” and discusses the development of belief and practice against the panorama of America’s varied physical and spiritual landscape. Givens will share highlights from his most recent book, Wrestling the Angel: The Foundations of Mormon Thought.

    About the Speaker

    terryl_web

    Terryl Givens did graduate work in intellectual history at Cornell and in comparative literature at UNC Chapel Hill, where he received his Ph.D. He holds the James A. Bostwick Chair of English and is Professor of Literature and Religion at the University of Richmond, where he teaches courses in nineteenth-century studies and the Bible’s influence on Western literature. His writing has been praised by the New York Times as “provocative reading,” and his numerous books include When Souls Had Wings, a history of the idea of premortal life in Western thought (Oxford 2010), By the Hand of Mormon: The American Scripture that Launched a World Religion (Oxford 2002), and, with Fiona Givens, The God Who Weeps: How Mormonism Makes Sense of Life (Shadow Mountain, 2012). His most recent book is Wrestling the Angel: The Foundations of Mormon Thought (Oxford 2014). He lives in Montpelier, Virginia.

     

    MHA

     


     

    5:30 p.m. in the Visions of the West Gallery

    Saturday, March 7, 2015

    Cyrus Edwin Dallin, Appeal to the Great Spirit, 1912, Plaster, metal armature, paint, 40 x 27 x 40 in. Gift of J. N. Bartfield Galleries, New York, in Memory of Jack N. Bartfield. 91.44 F

    Cyrus Edwin Dallin, Appeal to the Great Spirit, 1912, Plaster, metal armature, paint, 40 x 27 x 40 in. Gift of J. N. Bartfield Galleries, New York, in Memory of Jack N. Bartfield. 91.44 F

    5:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Galleries open for viewing
    5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Lecture/Interview with Terryl L. Givens

    The Mormon History Association presents:
    An American Journey Across the Landscape of Mormon Theology

    Free and open to the public

    Advance reservations have closed.  Space will be available at the door.  

    The history of the Mormon faith is a uniquely American journey originating in the shady woodlands of upstate New York in the 19th century, moving across the plains, opening new frontiers and finally setting its roots to flourish in the stark desert landscapes of the mountainous West. American sculptor and Utahan, Cyrus E. Dallin, whose Native American subjects are featured at The Rockwell Museum, was commissioned by the Mormon Church to sculpt the original Angel Moroni for the spire of the Salt Lake Temple in Utah. His statue became an enduring symbol of the Mormon faith and today remains the model for the sculpted angels now topping more than 140 temples throughout the world.

    We invite you to join us March 7 at 5:30 p.m. for a lecture sponsored by The Mormon History Association. The event will feature Professor Terryl L. Givens, as he “traces the essential contours of Mormon thought” and discusses the development of belief and practice against the panorama of America’s varied physical and spiritual landscape. Givens will share highlights from his most recent book, Wrestling the Angel: The Foundations of Mormon Thought.

    About the Speaker

    terryl_web

    Terryl Givens did graduate work in intellectual history at Cornell and in comparative literature at UNC Chapel Hill, where he received his Ph.D. He holds the James A. Bostwick Chair of English and is Professor of Literature and Religion at the University of Richmond, where he teaches courses in nineteenth-century studies and the Bible’s influence on Western literature. His writing has been praised by the New York Times as “provocative reading,” and his numerous books include When Souls Had Wings, a history of the idea of premortal life in Western thought (Oxford 2010), By the Hand of Mormon: The American Scripture that Launched a World Religion (Oxford 2002), and, with Fiona Givens, The God Who Weeps: How Mormonism Makes Sense of Life (Shadow Mountain, 2012). His most recent book is Wrestling the Angel: The Foundations of Mormon Thought (Oxford 2014). He lives in Montpelier, Virginia.

     

    MHA