Inspired by the centennial of women’s suffrage in the United States, The Rockwell Museum is proud to announce our 2020 theme, ADVANCING WOMEN.
  • Advancing Women in Public Art: Priorities, Pitfalls, Possibilities

    Thursday, January 23, 2020
    6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

    Add to Calendar 01/23/2020 6:00 PM 01/23/2020 7:00 PM America/New_York Advancing Women in Public Art: Priorities, Pitfalls, Possibilities

    Lecture by Erika Doss, PhD, Professor of American Studies at Notre Dame and Author of Memorial Mania: Feeling in America

    Rockwell Members: Free, Not-Yet-Members: $10, Students: $5

    Advance reservations recommended; walk-ins welcome.

    Register now

    Lecture Description

    According to one recent estimate, only about 400 of the roughly 5,200 public statues in the U.S. of historical figures depict women. And well through the end of the twentieth century, a majority of public art commissions were awarded to men. In this lecture, art historian Erika Doss discusses how public art in America is changing as communities challenge a lack of female representation with new initiatives centered on recognizing and honoring women.

    About Erika Doss

    Erika Doss, PhD, teaches in the Department of American Studies at the University of Notre Dame.  Her books include Benton, Pollock, and the Politics of Modernism: From Regionalism to Abstract Expressionism (1991), Spirit Poles and Flying Pigs: Public Art and Cultural Democracy in American Communities (1995), looking at Life Magazine (editor, 2001), Memorial Mania: Public Feeling in America (2010), and American Art of the 20th-21st Centuries (2017).  The recipient of several Fulbright awards, Doss has also held fellowships at the Stanford Humanities Center, the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

     

     

     

    The Rockwell Museum, 111 Cedar Street, Corning, NY 14830

    Lecture by Erika Doss, PhD, Professor of American Studies at Notre Dame and Author of Memorial Mania: Feeling in America

    Rockwell Members: Free, Not-Yet-Members: $10, Students: $5

    Advance reservations recommended; walk-ins welcome.

    Register now

    Lecture Description

    According to one recent estimate, only about 400 of the roughly 5,200 public statues in the U.S. of historical figures depict women. And well through the end of the twentieth century, a majority of public art commissions were awarded to men. In this lecture, art historian Erika Doss discusses how public art in America is changing as communities challenge a lack of female representation with new initiatives centered on recognizing and honoring women.

    About Erika Doss

    Erika Doss, PhD, teaches in the Department of American Studies at the University of Notre Dame.  Her books include Benton, Pollock, and the Politics of Modernism: From Regionalism to Abstract Expressionism (1991), Spirit Poles and Flying Pigs: Public Art and Cultural Democracy in American Communities (1995), looking at Life Magazine (editor, 2001), Memorial Mania: Public Feeling in America (2010), and American Art of the 20th-21st Centuries (2017).  The recipient of several Fulbright awards, Doss has also held fellowships at the Stanford Humanities Center, the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.