• Edwin Schupman Lecture: American Indian Responses to Environmental Challenges

    April 12
    April 12


    Thursday, April 12, 2018

    Lecture by Edwin Schupman, Manager of Native Knowledge 360°, National Museum of the American Indian

    6:00 – 7:00 p.m.
    Rockwell Members: Free, Not-Yet-Members: $10, Students: $5

    Advance reservations recommended; space is limited. Click here to register

    Left: Ornamental basket by Mohawk artist Mary Adams. National Museum of the American Indian. Right: Emerald Ash Borer head. Wikimedia Commons.

    Left: Ornamental basket by Mohawk artist Mary Adams. National Museum of the American Indian. Right: Emerald Ash Borer head. Wikimedia Commons.

    For the Akwesasne Mohawk people, the making of beautiful and functional baskets from black ash trees has long been an important cultural tradition. However, several environmental factors now threaten black ash. The education office of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) worked with members of the Akwesasne Mohawk community to document their work to protect and ensure the survival of black ash trees. In this presentation, learn how Mohawk culture, values, and indigenous knowledge, along with Western science and technology, inform the environmental work of this contemporary Native nation. This work is part of NMAI’s Native Knowledge 360°, a national education initiative to inspire and promote improvement of education about American Indians.

    About Edwin Schupman

    Edwin Schupman, Manager of Native Knowledge 360°, National Museum of the American IndianEdwin Schupman, a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma, is the manager of Native Knowledge 360° (NK360°), the National Museum of the American Indian’s national education initiative to inspire and promote improvement of education about American Indians. The goal of NK360° is to change ill-informed yet broadly held views about Native American history and cultures by providing high-quality educational resources, creating a national teacher-training program, and building national advocacy and partnership networks.

    Schupman completed a master’s degree in Music Theory at Miami University and doctoral coursework in ethnomusicology at the University of California, Los Angeles. After completing a repatriation project with early recordings of American Indian music at the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress, Schupman began his long career in the field of American Indian education. Beginning in 1988 he worked for ORBIS Associates, an American Indian education firm, creating culture and standards-based lessons on American Indian topics, training teachers nationwide, and evaluating educational projects. At the Bureau of Indian Education, he co-wrote a culture-based health and wellness curriculum and developed a national teacher training program. In 2004, he joined the education staff at the National Museum of the American Indian. During Schupman’s career, he has conducted education work in over 170 Native American reservation and non-reservation communities nationwide.

  • Events Admission Tickets Become a Member

    What's Happening
    at The Rockwell

    PERSPECTIVES

    Don't miss a thing!

    Be the first to know about activities at The Rockwell by signing up for our e-newsletter. Choose the topics that interest you: exhibitions and collections news, live music events, lectures, family and youth events, education news, volunteer opportunities, and new offerings from The Museum Store.

    Sign up for our e-newsletter