• Artistic Legacy: Haudenosaunee Women and Raised Beadwork

    Tuesday, February 18, 2020
    6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

    Add to Calendar 02/18/2020 6:00 PM 02/18/2020 7:00 PM America/New_York Artistic Legacy: Haudenosaunee Women and Raised Beadwork

    Panel: Karen Ann Hoffman, Niio Perkins and Wilma Zumpano

    Rockwell Members: Free, Not-Yet-Members: $10, Students: $5

    Online registration has closed. Tickets are available at the door. 

    Lecture Description

    This panel will bring together women currently practicing the raised beadwork style typical of Haudenosaunee culture. The talk will provide historical information on this beadwork style, as well as bridge this history and contemporary perspectives to illuminate the continuity of indigenous culture. The speakers will have an opportunity to talk about what they feel it means to be Haudenosaunee today, and what they have learned from working in this style.

    About Karen Ann Hoffman

    Karen Ann Hoffman is a citizen of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin. Her works are in the permanent collections of institutions such as the Smithsonian Institution – National Museum of the American Indian, The Wisconsin State Museum, The New York State Museum, Indianapolis Children’s’ Museum, Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, KS, Iroquois Indian Museum, Howes Caverns, NY, and The Field Museum in Chicago. Her award winning beadwork has been displayed at several other prestigious institutions. Karen teaches workshops regularly to adults, children, and creates customized workshops for individuals living with special needs and dementia. She was also a member of the Skanikwat Project, Nakuru, Kenya, Africa. The project, led by Samuel Thomas, used tribal beadwork as a medium to foster peace across languages, races, religions, and continents.

    About Niio Perkins

    Niio Perkins (Haudenosaunee) is an award-winning fashion designer and business owner, whose work has been purchased by and exhibited at galleries throughout North America. Her seminal work, a Haudenosaunee woman’s traditional outfit entitled “Emma,” is currently on display in the Native Fashion Now exhibition. She incorporates natural materials, heirloom fabrics and antique goods in her work and designs each piece inspired by the vibrant artistic tradition of her people. An expert in the Iroquois raised beadwork technique, her distinctive creations are sought after throughout the Indigenous art world. Niio is a Bear Clan woman of the Mohawk Nation and resides in Akwesasne, a Mohawk territory along the St. Lawrence River between the U.S. and Canada.

    About Wilma Zumpano

    Wilma (Kawennaronnion) Cook-Zumpano (Akwesasne, Mohawk) is a member of the Wolf Clan and has been making native garments and adornments since she was a teenager. Wilma presents her artwork at many museums, competes in juried shows, and has been warmly welcomed at the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market, National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) Art Market, Eiteljorg Museum Indian Market and Festival, and the Woodland Indian Art Show and Market. She is frequently invited to make educational presentations in schools and brings an age-appropriate, mini museum of objects to share her culture with students. She teaches beading classes and has been a Native Roots Artist Guild member since 2012.

     

     

    The Rockwell Museum, 111 Cedar Street, Corning, NY 14830

    Panel: Karen Ann Hoffman, Niio Perkins and Wilma Zumpano

    Rockwell Members: Free, Not-Yet-Members: $10, Students: $5

    Online registration has closed. Tickets are available at the door. 

    Lecture Description

    This panel will bring together women currently practicing the raised beadwork style typical of Haudenosaunee culture. The talk will provide historical information on this beadwork style, as well as bridge this history and contemporary perspectives to illuminate the continuity of indigenous culture. The speakers will have an opportunity to talk about what they feel it means to be Haudenosaunee today, and what they have learned from working in this style.

    About Karen Ann Hoffman

    Karen Ann Hoffman is a citizen of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin. Her works are in the permanent collections of institutions such as the Smithsonian Institution – National Museum of the American Indian, The Wisconsin State Museum, The New York State Museum, Indianapolis Children’s’ Museum, Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, KS, Iroquois Indian Museum, Howes Caverns, NY, and The Field Museum in Chicago. Her award winning beadwork has been displayed at several other prestigious institutions. Karen teaches workshops regularly to adults, children, and creates customized workshops for individuals living with special needs and dementia. She was also a member of the Skanikwat Project, Nakuru, Kenya, Africa. The project, led by Samuel Thomas, used tribal beadwork as a medium to foster peace across languages, races, religions, and continents.

    About Niio Perkins

    Niio Perkins (Haudenosaunee) is an award-winning fashion designer and business owner, whose work has been purchased by and exhibited at galleries throughout North America. Her seminal work, a Haudenosaunee woman’s traditional outfit entitled “Emma,” is currently on display in the Native Fashion Now exhibition. She incorporates natural materials, heirloom fabrics and antique goods in her work and designs each piece inspired by the vibrant artistic tradition of her people. An expert in the Iroquois raised beadwork technique, her distinctive creations are sought after throughout the Indigenous art world. Niio is a Bear Clan woman of the Mohawk Nation and resides in Akwesasne, a Mohawk territory along the St. Lawrence River between the U.S. and Canada.

    About Wilma Zumpano

    Wilma (Kawennaronnion) Cook-Zumpano (Akwesasne, Mohawk) is a member of the Wolf Clan and has been making native garments and adornments since she was a teenager. Wilma presents her artwork at many museums, competes in juried shows, and has been warmly welcomed at the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market, National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) Art Market, Eiteljorg Museum Indian Market and Festival, and the Woodland Indian Art Show and Market. She is frequently invited to make educational presentations in schools and brings an age-appropriate, mini museum of objects to share her culture with students. She teaches beading classes and has been a Native Roots Artist Guild member since 2012.